8 Breathtaking Walks in Yorkshire

Yorkshire Wolds Way Part One: Hessle to South Cave

This walk takes you through a great variety of landscapes, including the banks of the mighty Humber, plantation forests, quaint villages, gorgeous dams and ponds with undulating landscapes offering steeper climbs. It’s a great, full day’s walk suitable for new and experienced walkers.

Map:

Click on the map above to view full size, or click here to see the full route.

Time: 5–6 hours

Distance: 11.7 miles

Rating: Medium to hard

Facilities: Public toilets at start of route (Humber Bridge Tourist Information Centre), Welton (for pubs and cafes).

What it offers:

  • A satisfyingly challenging walk
  • Breath-taking views of the dramatic Humber Bridge (pictured above)
  • A great variety of landscapes, including the shores of the Humber, huge plantations, picturesque villages, spectacular dams and ponds with rolling landscapes that will challenge your legs
  • Before the walk explore Beverley – Oly, local and owner of Butt Farm (a good place to camp before you do the walk) recommends:
    • Skidby Windmill & the Museum of Rural life
    • A visit to the minster
    • A pint in The Barrel
    • A visit to the Saturday market

A view of the Humber Estuary from the start of the walk:

Starting point: Sculpture on the shore of the Humber Estuary just east of Humber Bridge.

Where to stop for lunch: Welton, try The White Horse, or The Green Dragon for a pub lunch. Or grab some food from Vanessa Deli at Beverley Market and make up a delicious picnic – highly recommended by Oly at Butt Farm. If the market isn’t on, there are loads of small independent food shops in Beverley where you can stock up.

Where to stay nearby:

Try these for accommodation near the beginning of the walk:

For the end of the walk try any of the B&Bs in South Cave:

 

Aysgarth Falls via Castle Bolton Circular Walk

An easy circular walk taking in the ruins at Bolton Castle and the Asygarth Falls, said to be the most beautiful waterfalls in the country. You’ll pass through some gorgeous woodland too.

Map:

Click on the map above to view full size, or click here to see the full route.

Time: 2 hours 40 mins

Distance: 6.75 miles

Rating: Easy to moderate

Facilities: Toilets in car park, café at Bolton Castle and pubs & cafes in Aysgarth

What it offers:

  • Get up close and personal with some of the most stunning waterfalls in the country
  • A stop at Bolton Castle, which has all sorts of interesting things going on (you can go and look around inside for a small fee, if you like)

A view from the rocks on Aysgarth Falls:

Starting point: Aysgarth Falls car park

Where to stop for lunch: Picnic on the village green in front of Bolton Castle, or visit the tea rooms.

Post-walk drink:

You can also find accommodation in all of the above.

Where to stay nearby:

 

Danes Dyke to Flamborough Head

“Walking Flamborough Head from Danes Dyke is a spectacular yet straightforward 9 mile route, with dramatic sea views and amazing chalk cliffs, eroded into some remarkable shapes” — John at happyhiker.co.uk.

Map:

Click on the map above to view full size, or click here to see the full route.

Time: 3–4 hours

Distance: 9.3 miles

Rating: Easy

Facilities: Toilets at lighthouse, North Landing Café, plenty of benches

What it offers:

  • Breathtaking sea views.
  • Eroded chalk cliffs creating spectacular shapes – these are a Site of Special Scientific Interest.
  • Danes dyke – a prehistoric defensive ditch, still intact.
  • The oldest complete lighthouse in England, still operational, at Flamborough Head.
  • Incredible wildlife, including rare sea birds, seals, puffins, crabs and lots more. This is one of the best bird watching areas in Europe and has been a Nature Reserve since 2002.

Looking out from the beach at North Landing:

Starting Point: Danes Dyke Carpark

Where to stop for lunch: We recommend taking a picnic, finding a nice spot on the cliffs and taking in the incredible view, if the weather permits. Otherwise, there are frequent cafes along the way. Try:

For post walk options, try:

Where to stay nearby:

 

Appleton-le-Moors Circular Walk to Hutton-le-Hole via Lastingham

“This is an easy circular walk from the peaceful Appleton-le-Moors, across heather-covered moorland to pretty Hutton-le-Hole then on to Lastingham, with its dramatic church. In summer, you will be wowed by the purple colour of the heather” — John at happyhiker.co.uk.

Map:

Click on the map above to view full size, or click here to see the full route.

Time: 3 hours

Distance: 9 miles

Rating: Easy

Facilities: Public toilets at the car park at Hutton-le-Hole, teashops and pubs in Hutton-le-Hole and Lastingham

What it offers:

  • Beautiful purple heather in the summer time
  • The gorgeous village of Hutton-le-Hole
  • The Ryedale Folk Museum, which is well worth popping into
  • The ancient crypt in St Mary’s church dating from 1078AD

A view across the moors above Hutton-le-Hole:

Starting Point: The Moors Inn in Appleton-le-Moor

Where to stop for lunch: During the walk try The Crown or The Forge Tea Room in Hutton-le-hole, or The Blacksmith’s Arms in Lastingham.

Where to stay nearby:

 

Hole of Horcum via Levisham Moor Walk

“This classic walk across the North York Moors lets you enjoy one of the great open spaces in the country and take in the views from the famous Hole of Horcum, North Yorkshire’s very own ‘Grand Canyon’ ” — John at happyhiker.co.uk.

Map:

Click on the map above to view full size, or click here to see the full route.

Time: 3–4 hours

Distance: 6.5 miles

Rating: Moderate

Facilities: Toilets available at the pub in Levisham

What it offers:

  • Fantastic open spaces.
  • Views of the iconic Hole of Horcum.
  • Ancient earthworks and burial sites in the heather of Levisham Moor.
  • Skelton Tower, a ruined folly and Grade II listed building.
  • A chance to see some steam locomotives on the North York Moors Railway from Skelton Tower.
  • A short diversion takes you to Levisham station, an old stop on North Yorkshire Moors Railway. Volunteers have worked hard to restore it to how it would have been in 1912.

Standing on the brink of the Hole or Horcum:

Starting Point: The village of Levisham

Where to stop for lunch: If you want to stop en-route you’ll need to take a picnic with you. Settle down on the edge of the Hole of Horcum to take in the spectacular scenery.

Once the walk is finished, try:

Where to stay nearby:

 

Robin Hood’s Bay to Whitby Walk

“This lovely walk takes you along an easy coast path, with just one steep but short ascent and descent at Maw Wike Hole. You will get vast panoramic views from Whitby to the white cliffs at Flamborough Head” — John at happyhiker.co.uk.

Map:

Click on the map above to view full size, or click here to see the full route.

Time: 3 hours

Distance: 7 miles

Rating: Easy

Facilities: Toilets in Robin Hood’s Bay and Whitby

What it offers:

  • Vast panoramic views from Whitby to the white cliffs at Flamborough Head
  • A visit to the picturesque fishing/smugglers’ village of Robin Hood’s Bay – a maze of narrow passages and steep streets, make sure you look around before you set off.
  • Incredible views of Whitby Abbey, you can visit it too.
  • A walk down Whitby’s famous 199 steps

On the beach at Whitby:

Starting Point: The Old School at Fylingthorpe

Where to stop for lunch: Picnic along the way or try these places in Whitby:

or the Ye Dolphin in Robin Hood’s Bay

Where to stay nearby:

 

Brimham Rocks Circular Walk

Photo by Andrew Hawkes Photography

The towering rock formations at Brimham Rocks are so unique and unusual you might feel like you’re exploring another world. The balancing rocks stand at a height of nearly 30 feet and many form incredibly unusual shapes. Scramble over, climb through and scurry up the various formations, or wind your way through the labyrinthine paths, before setting off on the main walk.

Map:

Click on the map above to view full size, or click here to see the full route.

Time: 3 hours

Distance: 6.3 miles

Rating: moderate

Facilities: public toilets and kiosk at Brimham Rocks

What it offers:

  • kingfisher sightings along the river
  • The incredible rock formations – try and identify the formations known as the Dancing Bear, The Eagle, The Gorilla, The Smartie Tube and Rocking Stones
  • Bulrushes and dragonflies at the pond in the summer

Perching on a rock formation at Brimham Rocks:

Starting point: Brimham Rocks Car Park

Where to stop for lunch: A picnic along the way or grab lunch at the Brimham Rock refreshment kiosk.

Where to stay nearby:

 

Gordale Scar & Malham Cove Circular Walk

Gordale Scar is a breathtaking, huge gorge in Malham, North Yorkshire. It’s difficult to get a true sense of the place until you’ve walked through the Gordale campsite, along the beck and turned the corner into the scar itself, where it comes into full, majestic view. The scar is a limestone ravine most likely created by melting glaciers or a cavern collapse. It has two impressive waterfalls that you’ll encounter along your walk.

Map:

Click on the map above to view full size, or click here to see the full route.

Time: 3 hours

Distance: 7.6

Rating: hard

Facilities: Toilets,cafes and pubs in Malham

What it offers:

  • The smell of wild garlic and bluebells near Janet’s Foss
  • Janet’s Foss, named after Janet the Queen of the local fairies who, according to local legend, lived in a cave behind the waterfall
  • Incredible scenery of Gordale Scar and the opportunity to scramble up the waterfall
  • A walk along the beautiful Malham Tarn
  • A walk across the unique limestone pavement above Malham Cove

Standing at the bottom of the falls in the mouth of the gorge:

Starting point: National Park Centre car park in Malham

Where to stop for lunch:

Where to stay nearby: